A Faithful Friend is Better Than Economic Security

Keep your life free from love of money, and be content with what you have, for He has said, “I will never leave you nor forsake you.” ~Hebrews 13:5 (ESV)

This brought to mind Paul’s statement  regarding money.

For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evils.  It is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs

~1 Timothy 6:10 (ESV)

And Jesus:

No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other.  You cannot serve God and money.

~Matthew 6:24 (ESV)

In the US, one of the top concerns for voters (of all persuasions) is the state of the economy. We debate about socialism vs capitalism vs free market, federal/state taxation, world trade, national debt, local distribution and so on.

And we tend to panic when economic equilibrium takes a severe hit.

That is an interesting consideration.

Believe it or not, though, “the love of money” is NOT so much about money itself, but what the money represents.

Money (or “mammon”, in  KJV terminology) is simply the recognized currency of this fading world system.  It really does not matter whether we are trading in actual gold coinage, electronic transactions, or directly bartering goods…if the focus is primarily placed  on the material exchange, getting the best “deal”, and/or just building a comfortable home in this world, then we are at serious risk of serving/loving a master other than God.

 

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Thoughts on Christian Culture 3: What’s LOVE Got to Do With It?

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Image courtesy Nutdanai Apikhomboonwaroot @ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Everything, actually.

*For the commandments…are summed up in this word; “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”
Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.* ~Romans 13:9-10 (ESV)

Love is a topic that has continually made itself at home in my mind for more years than I care to admit. And, the more I consider what it ought to look like, the more I have to admit that we human beings tend to have a very skewed, self-centered understanding of what it means to love someone. Not everyone, of course…and not always. But, even the most dedicated disciple of Christ probably struggles to perfectly live out genuine love for their neighbor at some point.

If I’m understanding scripture properly, Love involves acceptance, honesty, kindness, patience and forgiveness. It affirms the value of all human life. (re 1 Corinthians 13).

It is not limited to just the things/people we like a lot. Nor is it entirely synonymous with the attraction involved with a romantic connection. It is not primarily an emotion, yet affects the emotions. It is not primarily action, but motivates our behavior. It is not primarily about what we can get to make us feel “happy”, but what we ought to be giving to ease the burdens others must carry.

Love is more a state of being, which empowers us to set aside selfish desires and focus on contributing to the eternal well-being of another person. For instance, love always should encourage others to pursue a vital relationship with Christ. It does not take pleasure in seeing others suffer (even if they might “deserve” it).

Love is protective in nature, and would never knowingly encourage someone to sin or approve of sin as a beneficial “lifestyle option”. In fact, love should be willing to do the unpopular thing and risk being hated for pleading with an individual to rethink any potentially devastating choice they may make. It doesn’t force people to stay against their will, yet will also welcome back those who repent of their mistakes and truly wish to engage in a God-centered relationship.

When we say “I love you” to someone, it should in some way reflect the pure, honest and unselfish nature of God.

This is just me thinking, again. I appreciate input from others, if anyone is so inclined.

“I’m Better Than That”…is a lie.

The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican
~Luke 18:11 (KJV)

If seeing other people’s sin doesn’t move us to compassion, it will inevitably (and irrationally) stoke our pride 😦

Truth is, it is God’s grace alone which prevents any of us from being “as bad as” the person whose sin is on display for the world to see. It is foolish to be arrogant over the fact that He didn’t allow me to sink as low as I had the potential to go.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke+18:10-12&version=KJV

Not my edit.

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